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Eurovision Contestants 2015: Montenegro

Nenad Knezevic Knez, a.k.a. Knez, is one of Montenegro's most popular artists. He started his career in 1992 and has produced 10 successful albums. This year, the 47-year-old singer will represent his country at the Eurovision song contest with the song “Adio.” For those who don’t understand Montenegrin, this ballad is about a relationship that doesn't end well, and about unrequited love — which seems to be one of the favorite themes this year. Perfect for all the violins and the women singing along with Knez.


The country became independent in 2006 and participated for the first time in the contest the following year. Since then, there's been only two songs in English, as Montenegro's artists generally prefer to sing in Montenegrin.

In the video, Knez also takes us on a nice tour of Montenegro. Its forests, mountains and Knez’s green and black velvet jacket have apparently convinced our team of expert judges to award him (for now) the lead spot in the competition!

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 9.25/10

Was there enough glitter? 3.5/10

Ok to quit your day job? 2.25/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 5/10

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