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Eurovision Contestants 2015: Moldova


Photo: Eurovision Song Contest

We've got so much to say about Moldova's entry for Eurovision 2015. Not about the song per say, which is just kind of blergh, but about the music video — a cops-and-robbers-BOOM-BANG-BANG car chase directed by a second-hand Moldovan version of Michael Bay.

In this masterpiece, which is a bit NSFW and a lot WTF, this year's contestant 23-year-old Eduard Romanyuta stars as the bad boy. He got himself locked up in jail, we're guessing for something haircut- or facial hair-related, and is chilling on the floor of his cell with his ball and chain. Because Moldovan prisons are just old-fashioned that way.

Long story short, he somehow manages to escape, and takes a policewoman hostage, stilettoes and all. Because Moldovan police is just sexist that way. An absurd car chase ensues, during which police cars seem to explode spontaneously. For some reason, the lady gets sick and throws up on the windscreen of the police car chasing them — which turns out to be a clever and non-violent way to shake off your pursuers.

Then — we definitely didn't see that coming — Eduard and Daria (or Valeria or Andreea, all valid Moldovan names) start smooching.

Seriously, dude.

SHE'S JUST PUKED, what's wrong with you?

Anyway, it makes a fellow officer giggle, and spoiler alert it looks like it was just a dream. Ta-dah.

Bonus bit of trivia: Just when you thought Romanyuta was just another brainless Bon Jovi wannabe, you learn that he's currently working on his PhD thesis about international competition of tax systems and tax policy of Ukraine in the context of euro integration. Impressive.

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 0.5/10

Was there enough glitter? 4.25/10

Ok to quit your day job? 0.75/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 1.83/10

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Geopolitics

Smaller Allies Matter: Afghanistan Offers Hard Lessons For Ukraine's Future

Despite controversies at home, Nordic countries were heavily involved in the NATO-led war in Afghanistan. As the Ukraine war grinds on, lessons from that conflict are more relevant than ever.

Photo of Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Johannes Jauhiainen

-Analysis-

HELSINKI — In May 2021, the Taliban took back power in Afghanistan after 20 years of international presence, astronomical sums of development aid and casualties on all warring sides.

As Kabul fell, a chaotic evacuation prompted comparisons to the fall of Saigon — and most of the attention was on the U.S., which had led the original war to unseat the Taliban after 9/11 and remained by far the largest foreign force on the ground. Yet, the fall of Kabul was also a tumultuous and troubling experience for a number of other smaller foreign countries who had been presented for years in Afghanistan.

In an interview at the time, Antti Kaikkonen, the Finnish Minister of Defense, tried to explain what went wrong during the evacuation.

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“Originally we anticipated that the smaller countries would withdraw before the Americans. Then it became clear that getting people to the airport had become more difficult," Kaikkonen said. "So we decided last night to bring home our last soldiers who were helping with the evacuation.”

During the 20-year-long Afghan war, the foreign troop presence included many countries:Finland committed around 2,500 soldiers,Sweden 8,000,Denmark 12,000 and Norway 9,000. And in the nearly two years since the end of the war, Finland,Belgium and theNetherlands have commissioned investigations into their engagements in Afghanistan.

As the number of fragile or failed states around the world increases, it’s important to understand how to best organize international development aid and the security of such countries. Twenty years of international engagement in Afghanistan offers valuable lessons.

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