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Prior to this year, Hungary had participated in the Eurovision Song Contest twelve times since their first entry in 1994 — which was coincidentally the year they achieved their best result, placing fourth.

This year's contestant, Boglárka Csemer, who goes by the name Boggie, had already gained worldwide recognition in January 2014 with the music video for her song "Nouveau Parfum." In the video which was seen by more than 30 million people all around the world, the singer was gradually photoshopped into a more "glamorous" version of herself.

In the music video for her Eurovision "Wars for Nothing," Boggie starts singing in front of Budapest's St. Stephen's Basilica to the sound of a single guitar, like some mildly depressed street busker, only to be joined by more and more people. Up to the point where, frankly, we start to fear for her safety.

But don't be fooled by Boggie's faux Kate Middletonian smile: Her song deals with the real stuff, man: "I see children joining the stars/Soldiers walk towards the dark, let me ask/Can you justify all the eyes/That will never see daylight?" Goosebumps.

As "Vladimir Putin" (we're guessing, not the real one) puts it in his YouTube comment: "Last year: child abuse. This year: wars. Get it together Hungary."

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 6/10

Was there enough glitter? 3.5/10

Ok to quit your day job? 2/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 3.83/10

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Russian state media reports that a fuel tanker exploded early Monday in an airfield near the city of Ryanza, southeast of Moscow, killing three and injuring six people. Another two people are reported to have been injured in another morning explosion at the Engles-2 airbase in the Saratov region, farther to the southeast.

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