Prior to this year, Hungary had participated in the Eurovision Song Contest twelve times since their first entry in 1994 — which was coincidentally the year they achieved their best result, placing fourth.

This year's contestant, Boglárka Csemer, who goes by the name Boggie, had already gained worldwide recognition in January 2014 with the music video for her song "Nouveau Parfum." In the video which was seen by more than 30 million people all around the world, the singer was gradually photoshopped into a more "glamorous" version of herself.

In the music video for her Eurovision "Wars for Nothing," Boggie starts singing in front of Budapest's St. Stephen's Basilica to the sound of a single guitar, like some mildly depressed street busker, only to be joined by more and more people. Up to the point where, frankly, we start to fear for her safety.

But don't be fooled by Boggie's faux Kate Middletonian smile: Her song deals with the real stuff, man: "I see children joining the stars/Soldiers walk towards the dark, let me ask/Can you justify all the eyes/That will never see daylight?" Goosebumps.

As "Vladimir Putin" (we're guessing, not the real one) puts it in his YouTube comment: "Last year: child abuse. This year: wars. Get it together Hungary."

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 6/10

Was there enough glitter? 3.5/10

Ok to quit your day job? 2/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 3.83/10

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Future

The Metaverse Will Make All That's Bad With The Internet Worse

The change of Facebook's name to Meta is a hint to the general public of where social media and digital sovereignty risks taking us in a future "virtual" world.

Creating a digital avatar in the metaverse

Raphaël Suire

-OpEd-

PARIS — The first bricks of the internet emerged in post-World War II California at the crossroads of a double ideology: military and libertarian, based on the virtues of decentralization. It was all about inventing a network infrastructure that was resilient to targeted attacks. It also allowed for individuals to be emancipated through a new set of capabilities, including in communication, interaction and learning, facilitated through a microcomputer.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ