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Nina Sublatti, Georgia’s entry for this year’s Eurovision Song Contest, wrote the song she will perform, “Warrior”, in just three hours in the middle of the night. This seems incredible when you know the lyrics are made up of such beautiful prose as “I'm a warrior/Isolated/World gonna listen to me/Violence/Set the free/Wings are gonna spread up/I'm a warrior.”

“Warrior”, Nina says, is about and for Georgian women. In the video, several women can be seen dressed as warriors from around the world, along with various animals such as birds, dogs and snakes.

Georgia has only participated in the Eurovision Song Contest six times. It could have ran for the 2009 edition, but it decided to boycott it when the European Broadcasting Union asked the country to re-write some of its lyrics that made reference to the then Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 2.75/10

Was there enough glitter? 2/10

Ok to quit your day job? 1.25/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 2/10

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2022 Kharkiv Pride Parade

Laura Valentina Cortés Sierra, Sophia Constantino and Lila Paulou

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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