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“What’s with the headphones?” you might ask, as the video almost seems to be a Beats by Dre commercial. Apparently, Marjetka and Raay — known as Maraaya — chose this accessory as their trademark because, you know, they're cool with the younger generation. Though the headphones have nothing to do with the song , "Here For You," a lovely love ballad.

Slovenia has unfortunately never done great in the Eurovision Song Contest. The country failed to get to the finals eight times since its first participation as an independent country, in 1993. But maybe 2015 is the year it all changes.


This year, Slovenia will count on the duo Maraaya to win the competition, and especially on Raay, one of the country's most popular music producers. He often works with Marjetka, but better still: They're married and have two children! Maybe that’s why she had no problem filming half the video naked, wearing only the aforementioned pair of headphones. Also a good argument to make her boyfriend stay.

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 2.75/10

Was there enough glitter? 5.25/10

Ok to quit your day job? 2.5/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 3.5/10

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Dottoré!

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