In 2001, Estonia became the first former Soviet country to win Eurovision. The annual song contest had become quite popular there after its first participation in 1994 and has always been since then. So much so that, in 2009, when Estonia said it would withdraw from the contest, set to be held in Moscow during to the ongoing Russo-Georgian War, the national broadcaster ERR announced it would still send an artist to perform in Russia due to public demand.

Six years later, the country will be represented by the duo Elina Born and Stig Rästa. Elina says she was first contacted by Stig, a popular singer in Estonia, when she was in class. A Facebook message from him popped up saying he enjoyed her voice when he saw this expand=1] video, and the young woman started crying.

They will perform “Goodbye to Yesterday”, a song about — from what we gather — a couple fighting because the guy didn’t wake the girl up when leaving.

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 4.25/10

Was there enough glitter? 2.5/10

Ok to quit your day job? 5.75/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 4.2/10

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Coronavirus

Why U.S. Vaccine Diplomacy In Latin America Makes "Good" Sense

Echoing its cultural diplomacy of the early 20th century, the United States is gifting vaccines to Latin America as part of a renewed "good neighbor'' policy.

Waiting to get the vaccine in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico

Andrea Matallana

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Just before and during World War II, the United States' Good Neighbor policy proved a very effective strategy to improve ties with Latin America. Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the policy's main goal was non-interference and non-intervention. The U.S. would instead focus on reciprocal exchanges with their southern neighbors, including through art and cultural diplomacy.

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