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When we first saw Australia would be competing in the 2015 edition of the European Song Contest, we simply thought the organizers misspelled “Austria”. But no, it turns out Aussies really enjoy the ESC.

In fact, the public broadcaster SBS has been airing the show for more than 30 years. In 2014, 3 million dedicated Australians — 13% of the population — watched it, which seems incredible considering it airs at 6 a.m. in the country's capital Canberra. Several Australian candidates also participated in the contest in the past, singing for other countries. Some even won, or came second to a expand=1] group of glittery Swedes.

Non-European countries such as Israel or Azerbaijan have been Eurovision contestants for a few years now — and someone has to replace Ukraine, who is taking a break this year for personal reasons. So welcome, Australia, to the oddest show on earth.

Representing the land down under is Guy Sebastian, a 33-year-old soul/R&B/gospel singer from Adelaide. He was the first ever winner of Australian Idol in 2003 and has released seven studio albums since.

On May 23, Guy will perform his track “Tonight Again”, a song about doing “whatchya want”, forgetting tomorrow and having fun tonight, baby.

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 0.5/10

Was there enough glitter? 0.25/10

Ok to quit your day job? 2.75/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 1.17/10

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Dottoré!

Sowing The Seeds Of Paranoia

"They must be dumping garbage — good, it makes for good fertilizer!"

"Slowly, we were the only ones left"

Mariateresa Fichele

"Dottoré, I know a lot of flags, and let me tell you why. I grew up in the province of Caserta, and — like everybody in those days — my parents owned a piece of land, and they would take me with them to farm it.

I remember there were other kids in the fields around us. But then, slowly, we were the only ones left because everybody was selling the land, making a lot of money off of it too.

Papà wouldn't listen to reason and he kept the land. But in the meantime, instead of farmers, trucks began to arrive. Many many trucks, unloading thousands of barrels and burying them into the ground.

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