The death toll from Ecuador's worst earthquake in decades has topped 400, as rescue workers continue searching for survivors three days after the 7.8-magnitude quake hit the South American country's northwest coast. The government put the death toll at 413 late Monday, including six foreign nationals. The total number of wounded has risen to 2,068. President Rafael Correa said he expected the toll to rise further.

"Rescue and Solidarity," read the Tuesday front-page headline of Cuenca-based daily El Mercurio.


The hardest-hit area was the coastal Manabi Province where some 200 people died. The Ecuadorian government has declared a state of emergency in the worst-hit provinces.

More than 1,000 specialized search and rescue personnel and firefighters from other Latin American countries have been deployed to the devastated towns of Portoviejo, Manta, Pedernales and Jama. Rescue and recovery aid has come in from Venezuela, Colombia, Chile, Peru, El Salvador, Cuba and Mexico. In addition, Cuba has deployed 60 doctors to Portoviejo, Manta and Chone where the army has installed mobile hospitals.

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Geopolitics

​An Egyptian Son's Plea: For​ My Father And Arab Spring Reconciliation

Essam El-Haddad, a senior adviser to President Morsi, was jailed more than eight years ago. His son Abdullah continues to fight for his father's liberation, which he says is a necessary path toward national union in post-Arab Spring Egypt.

Essam El-Haddad appearing in court

Abdullah El-Haddad

-Essay-

CAIRO — My heartbeat quickens as I see my mother's name flash on my phone screen. I stop everything I'm doing and try to remember to breathe. I lift the phone to my ear and brace myself for the bad news that will inevitably come about my father who has been locked in an Egyptian prison for more than eight years. They say things get easier with time, but these phone calls flout that rule. Nothing about them gets easier, especially when I'm receiving them in forced exile.

My father, Essam El-Haddad, was a senior adviser to President Mohammed Morsi. He was received by foreign governments and met with officials around the world. Now, at 67 years old, he languishes in solitary confinement. Despite his failing health, he has been denied medical care, having suffered four heart attacks since his detention. The little we know about my father's circumstances we learned through the rare occasions our family was allowed to visit him by Egypt's prison authorities. These visits have stopped since 2016.

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