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Tempo, May 11, 2016

In the first public act after his apparent victory in this week's presidential election in the Philippines, populist candidate Rodrigo Duterte paid a visit his parents' tomb in his hometown of Davao.

Images of the 71-year-old long-serving mayor sobbing at the tomb were on many front pages of many national newspapers Wednesday in the wake of the election, where official results still have not been released. Still, all signs point to near certain victory for Duterte, believed to have obtained more than 6 million votes after a controversial campaign that included rape jokes, death threats and profane language, as well as growing comparisons to Donald Trump.

The Manila-based daily Tempo reports that at his family tomb, Duterte mumbled in the local Bisaya dialect as he paid respects to his parents: Hili ko Katoo, Kinsa ra man ko, "I can't believe this. Who am I? I'm just a nobody." The scene, which was recorded by local journalist Stella Esrtemera, quickly spread on the Internet in the Philippines.

Rodrigo Duterto crying at his parents' tomb

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