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blog

Duterte Sobs At Parents' Tomb After Philippines Election

Tempo, May 11, 2016

In the first public act after his apparent victory in this week's presidential election in the Philippines, populist candidate Rodrigo Duterte paid a visit his parents' tomb in his hometown of Davao.

Images of the 71-year-old long-serving mayor sobbing at the tomb were on many front pages of many national newspapers Wednesday in the wake of the election, where official results still have not been released. Still, all signs point to near certain victory for Duterte, believed to have obtained more than 6 million votes after a controversial campaign that included rape jokes, death threats and profane language, as well as growing comparisons to Donald Trump.

The Manila-based daily Tempo reports that at his family tomb, Duterte mumbled in the local Bisaya dialect as he paid respects to his parents: Hili ko Katoo, Kinsa ra man ko, "I can't believe this. Who am I? I'm just a nobody." The scene, which was recorded by local journalist Stella Esrtemera, quickly spread on the Internet in the Philippines.

Rodrigo Duterto crying at his parents' tomb

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FOCUS: Israel-Palestine War

After Abbas: Here Are The Three Frontrunners To Be The Next Palestinian Leader

Israel and the West have often asked: Where is the Palestinian Mandela? The divided regimes between Gaza and the West Bank continues to make it difficult to imagine the future Palestinian leader. Still, these three names are worth considering.

Photo of Mahmoud Abbas speaking into microphone

Abbas is 88, and has been the leading Palestinian political figure since 2005

Thaer Ganaim/APA Images via ZUMA
Elias Kassem

Updated Dec. 5, 2023 at 12:05 a.m.

Israel has set two goals for its Gaza war: destroying Hamas and releasing hostages.

But it has no answer to, nor is even asking the question: What comes next?

The government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has rejected the return of the current Palestinian Authority to govern post-war Gaza. That stance seems opposed to the U.S. Administration’s call to revitalize the Palestinian Authority (PA) to assume power in the coastal enclave.

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But neither Israel nor the U.S. put a detailed plan for a governing body in post-war Gaza, let alone offering a vision for a bonafide Palestinian state that would also encompass the West Bank.

The Palestinian Authority, which administers much of the occupied West Bank, was created in1994 as part of the Oslo Accords peace agreement. It’s now led by President Mahmoud Abbas, who succeeded Yasser Arafat in 2005. Over the past few years, the question of who would succeed Abbas, now 88 years old, has largely dominated internal Palestinian politics.

But that question has gained new urgency — and was fundamentally altered — with the war in Gaza.

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