When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Deadly 'Furry Cat' Caterpillar Strikes In Argentina

Watch out, Argentina — a deadly caterpillar with a bristle-like appearance is on the loose.

Cristian García, 22, was sipping maté on the porch of his Santa Ana home when a rare venemous Hylesia nigricans catepillar dropped into his lap. Authorities say the young man is fighting for his life in intensive care.

Contact on human skin with the caterpillar, commonly known as the "hairy one" or "furry cat," can cause edema and hemorrhages in various parts of the body, as well as severe pain and blood clotting, says the country’s Ministry of Public Health.

The antidote, which isn’t produced in Argentina, had to be brought in from Brazil, which García's family hopes will save his life.

Roberto Stetson, who heads Argentina’s Venomous Animals Program, said that every time there’s a bite from banana spiders or other tarantulas, they “must ask favors from their neighbors.” He added that it’s difficult for them to give them the cure as the neighboring countries don't have any standing agreement for the supply of such substances, reported the Argentine daily Clarin.

The only other reported incidents have taken place close to the Brazilian border, but this new case in Santa Ana shows that the caterpillar has expanded its territory, increases the possibility of more human victims.

Photo: Serox

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Ideas

Chile's "Silent Majority" Reminds Us About The Overreach Of Identity Politics

An overwhelming majority of Chileans quietly but very clearly voted to reject a draft constitution, which it feared would lock the country into a radical socialist mould.

Chileans protest against the proposed Constitution in Santiago.

José María del Pino

-Analysis-

In Chile, the Left has fallen victim to its love of identity politics. Dizzied by the country's social upheavals and calls for change since 2019, it forgot that at the end of the day, Chile is the home of moderation.

The rejection Sunday by most voters of a proposed, new constitutional text comes in spite of the fact that 80% of Chileans still want to overhaul the constitution bequeathed by the country's conservative, military regime of the 1970s.

The vast majority of Chileans have in recent years come to a shared conclusion, that Chile's socio-economic advances and undoubted prosperity must be democratized and fairly shared out among its territories and socio-economic classes.

For the Chilean Left, led by the young President Gabriel Boric, this was the biggest window of opportunity in its history. It had never had such a clear mandate for creating a transformative project based on a new constitution, and this in addition to the symbolic weight of putting an end to the constitution of the late dictator, Augusto Pinochet.


Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ