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Connecticut death penalty repeal passes hurdle

Connecticut's House of Representatives has approved a bill to ban the death penalty that was passed by the state Senate last week and is expected to be signed into law by the governor, making Connecticut the fifth state to ban capital punishment

(AFP) New York - However, it would still allow the state to execute the 11 men currently on death row, a compromise struck by the Democratic majority, which supported the bill, and Republicans who opposed it.

The years-long effort to repeal the death penalty in Connecticut has been been shadowed by a shocking 2007 triple murder, and the often tense debate on the House floor lasted more than nine hours, according to the Hartford Courant.

"This vote tonight literally allows Connecticut to break with a centuries-old tradition of executing people and rejoin the rest of the Western world," it quoted Benjamin Todd Jealous, the head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), a civil rights group, as saying.

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Geopolitics

Taliban Redux, Cleaned-Up Image Can't Mask Their Cruel Reality

Twenty years later the Islamist group is back in power in Afghanistan, but trying this time to win international support. Now that several months have passed, experts on the ground can offer a clear assessment if the group has genuinely transformed on such issues as women's rights and free speech.

The Taliban have now been in power for almost five months

Atal Ahmadzai and Faten Ghosn

The international community is closely monitoring the Taliban, after the group re-seized power in Afghanistan in August 2021.

There is legitimate reason for concern. The Taliban are again ruling through fear and draconian rules.

The Taliban’s last regime, in the mid-1990s, was marked by human rights violations, including massacres, mass detentions and rape. The regime collapsed on Nov. 14, 2001, shortly after the U.S. launched its global war on terrorism.

Even after the Taliban officially fell from power, their subsequent two decades of insurgency produced various gross human rights violations, an encompassing term under international human rights law.

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