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Jornal de Noticias, Jan. 25, 2015

"Marcelo crowned," Portuguese daily Jornal de Noticias writes on its front page Monday, as center-right candidate Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa won Sunday's presidential election with 52% in the first round, a resounding victory otherwise marked by a low turnout of just 48.8%.

"The people command, and the people chose me," Rebelo de Sousa said, promising to "unify and pacify" a country left politically divided by last year's general election and the confusion that followed.

In November, inconclusive parliamentary elections had put Prime Minister António Costa's Socialist government at the helm of a fragile coalition.

Rebelo de Sousa, a 67-year-old law professor famous for his work as a TV pundit and political commentator, faced nine other candidates, including center-left Antonio Sampaio da Nóvoa, who finished second with just over 22%.

The new president pledged to work with the anti-austerity left-wing coalition government.

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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