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Turkey

Ankara Bombings: 'The Cost Of Peace'

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Milliyet, Oct. 12, 2015

"The cost shouldn't be so high," Turkish daily Milliyetwriteson Monday's front page, quoting and featuring a picture of Ä°zzettin Çevik, the blood-covered school teacher who became one of the symbols of the toll of Saturday's deadly bombings in Ankara.

Çevik, who was photographed by Reuters amid the carnage, lost his daughter and sister when two bombs were detonated outside the entrance of the capital's central railway station. He was first reported to have died from his wounds but survived, CNN Türk reports.

The attack killed at least 97 people, though some sources say the number of victims stands at 128, with hundreds more wounded.

"The price of peace should not be so heavy and painful," Milliyet quoted Çevik as saying.

No group has claimed responsibility for the deadliest terror attack in the country's history, but Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu says the prime suspect is ISIS, Hürriyetreports. The attack is believed to have been executed by two suicide bombers outside the city's main railway station, where activists were gathering before a planned protest against the violence between the Turkish government and Kurdish groups.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is hoping the upcoming Nov. 1 elections will restore his party's parliamentary majority, has already ruled out postponing the vote.

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Society

Genoa Postcard: A Tale Of Modern Sailors, Echos Of The Ancient Mariner

Many seafarers are hired and fired every seven months. Some keep up this lifestyle for 40 years while sailing the world. Some of those who'd recently docked in the Italian port city of Genoa, share a taste of their travels that are connected to a long history of a seafaring life.

A sailor smokes a cigarette on the hydrofoil Procida

A sailor on the hydrofoil Procida in Italy

Daniele Frediani/Mondadori Portfolio via ZUMA Press
Paolo Griseri

GENOA — Cristina did it to escape after a tough breakup. Luigi because he dreamed of adventures and the South Seas. Marianna embarked just “before the refrigerator factory where I worked went out of business. I’m one of the few who got severance pay.”

To hear their stories, you have to go to the canteen on Via Albertazzi, in Italy's northern port city of Genoa, across from the ferry terminal. The place has excellent minestrone soup and is decorated with models of the ships that have made the port’s history.

There are 38,000 Italian professional sailors, many of whom work here in Genoa, a historic port of call that today is the country's second largest after Trieste on the east coast. Luciano Rotella of the trade union Italian Federation of Transport Workers says the official number of maritime workers is far lower than the reality, which contains a tangle of different laws, regulations, contracts and ethnicities — not to mention ancient remnants of harsh battles between shipowners and crews.

The result is that today it is not so easy to know how many people sail, nor their nationalities.

What is certain is that every six to seven months, the Italian mariner disembarks the ship and is dismissed: they take severance pay and after waits for the next call. Andrea has been sailing for more than 20 years: “When I started out, to those who told us we were earning good money, I replied that I had a precarious life: every landing was a dismissal.”

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