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Animal Abuse: Brutal Horse-Drawn Cabs In Colombia

Animal Abuse: Brutal Horse-Drawn Cabs In Colombia

Colombia's Caribbean coast used to be filled with slaves, but today in Cartagena de Indias, it's a plethora of tourists who come to visit this World Heritage Site in horse-drawn cabs.

It's all so pretty — except for the part where the horses are overworked, expand=1] and sometimes worked to death. Apparently it's not uncommon for passers-by to witness them collapsing from exhaustion or dehydration, as happened recently in near Bocagrande beach. Minutes after collapsing, the horse died, reported El Espectador.

The daily observed that activists have repeatedly denounced horses' working conditions in Cartagena, and complained that those taken out of circulation for exhaustion were sent back to work too soon before fully recovering.

Cabbies have reportedly rejected proposals to place microchips or sensors on their horses to monitor their physical state.

Photo: via caracol.com.co

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Ideas

Calmez-Vous, Americans: It's Quite OK To Call Us "The French"

A widely mocked tweet by the Associated Press tells its reporters to avoid dehumanizing labels such as "the poor" or "the French". But one French writer replies that the real dehumanizing threat is when open conversation becomes impossible.

Parisians sitting on a café terrasse.

Parisians sitting on a café terrasse.

Dirk Broddin on Flickr
Gaspard Koenig

-Essay-

PARIS — The largest U.S. news agency, the Associated Press (AP) tweeted a series of recommendations aimed at journalists: “We recommend avoiding general and often dehumanizing 'the' labels such as the poor, the mentally ill, the French, the disabled, the college-educated. Instead use, wording such as people with mental illnesses.”

The inclusion of “The French” in this list of groups likely to be offended has evoked well-deserved sarcasm. It finally gives me the opportunity to be part of a minority and to confirm at my own expense, while staying true to John Stuart Mill's conception of free speech: that offense is not a crime.

Offense should prompt quips, denial, mockery, and sometimes indifference. It engages conflict in the place where a civilized society accepts and cultivates it: in language.

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