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'Al-Qaeda jail break' in Yemeni city of Aden

Fifteen al-Qaeda militants have broken out of a prison in the southern Yemeni city of Aden, officials have said. The militants escaped through a six metre tunnel dug from the yard at the city's central prison.

(CNN) Aden - The escapees encountered no government resistance, the security officials said. Security forces closed down all roads leading to Aden and created checkpoints on every main street after the escape.

Witnesses said tanks were deployed, and hundreds of additional troops were stationed in front of security offices and government buildings. Some residents in Aden complained that security forces on roads and checkpoints were using excessive force with civilians.

"The forces were treating us as if we are criminals, at times making threats to anyone who asks them questions," said Khaled Mansoor, a bus driver in Aden.

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Society

Aging Cities Of The Future — How Urban Planning Can Factor In For Dementia

As the population ages, the likelihood of diseases such as dementia increases. That means we need to rethink how we design and build cities for the future. A look up close from Lisbon.

Photo of an elderly man walking near tramway tracks in Lisbon, Portugal

Following tram tracks in Lisbon, Portugal

Ana da Cunha

LISBON — For Maria Manuela Maia, there are routes in Lisbon that are hard to forget, like the one that connects her home to the parish. But there are others where memory fails her. “Manuela is more or less autonomous,” says Orlando, her husband. “But the problem is when you change streets. Then she no longer knows where our house is.”

That's when she gets lost. And when she meets other elderly, homeless or lonely people, she talks to them. "Need something? You can come to my house and I'll help,” she says, trying to help them. Her husband, Orlando, calms her down: “That gentleman doesn't need anything, don't worry, let's go. Let's walk,” he says, guiding her through the streets.

Maria Manuela and Orlando met more than 50 years ago when Orlando was serving with the troops in Angola. “I corresponded with 22 girls,” he says. Of these 22, I would only choose one: Maria Manuela.

After so many years, the battlefield is now a different one: Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, which leads to a progressive deterioration of cognitive functions. One of them is memory.

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