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SPOTLIGHT: WHY ORLANDO IS DIFFERENT

After every horrific attack on the innocent, the press and public take stock of what has been wrought by turning to the past. And so it is with the cold-blooded killing of 50 people early Sunday in a nightclub in Orlando, Florida. We recall mass shootings in places like Columbine, Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook, and indeed the toll in Florida has surpassed them all as the deadliest such use of firearms in U.S. history. Reports that the shooter, Omar Mateen, had links to Islamic terrorists takes our thoughts not only to the Sept. 11 and San Bernardino attacks on American soil but also the targeting of civilians by ISIS and other groups nearly every day in the Middle East and Africa. Orlando, likewise, traces a straight line back to this past Nov. 13 in Paris, where young people's lives were cut short for simply trying to enjoy a weekend evening with friends in some restaurant or concert hall.


But Sunday's horror is bound to be forever tied to another place, called Stonewall. That's the name of a New York City gay bar that became the symbol for the burgeoning gay rights movement in the U.S. and beyond, after it was raided by police in 1969. The nightclub targeted Sunday, Pulse, also catered to the LGBT crowd; and no doubt when the identities of the victims are ultimately determined, it will be the highest death toll of an attack on gay, lesbian and transgender Americans ever.


In a better world than the one we have now, such an act might actually serve to unite very different kinds of people in defense of the sanctity of any and every life. Instead, chillingly, it appears to already be uniting those who would otherwise be enemies in their shared hate. Much has been made of how far LGBT rights have come in the past few years. Sadly, hatred and ignorance — and violence — are keeping pace.


Here is how world newspapers covered the Orlando attack.

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Families wait for news of their missing relatives following the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas on Tuesday

Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou and Bertrand Hauger

👋 Barev!*

Welcome to Wednesday, where 21 are killed in a school shooting in Texas, Davos focuses on Ukraine, and a vertigo-inducing world record is broken at Mont-Saint-Michel. Die Welt also offers a psychoanalyst’s perspective on how war survivors pass trauma onto their children.

[*Armenian]

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