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About us

The Mission

Worldcrunch delivers the best global journalism previously shut off from English language readers: selecting, translating and editing content from top foreign-language outlets.

The Method

The most relevant foreign-language stories are produced in English by Worldcrunch staff and contributors around the globe, deployed to react quickly to breaking events and find the best content in the international media. We are also creating a platform, Crunch It!, to build a community of newshounds who will flag and help translate interesting stories from both mainstream media outlets and blogs, as well as produce stories of their own.

The Vision

With Worldcrunch, the great untapped resource of foreign-language news and information is hereby available. By combining professional journalistic standards with the energy of the web's flock of curious readers, writers and translators -- and building a framework for copyright access and distribution -- we create a whole new well of top-shelf news content from the best sources covering the world today. And our vision for the future? Worldcrunch will be the virtual square where language barriers fade, and a new brand of global journalism is born.

The Team

The Buzz

Spreading the News in Europe, in English

nytimes.com | May 8, 2011

As news organizations around the world shut down foreign bureaus, journalists, entrepreneurs and even government bodies in Europe are creating new news ventures to try to fill the void.
As a result, readers seeking international news are increasingly spoiled for choice — especially if they read English, the common second language of many Europeans and the favored tongue for many of the new outlets... Read all

News translation service Worldcrunch chalks up first distribution deal

journalism.co.uk | April 12, 2011

News translation platform Worldcrunch has announced its first distribution deal this week, in a new partnership with Time.com.
Worldcrunch, which went live in December last year, was set up by former bureau chief for Time magazine Jeff Israely and former CEO of Ask.com France Irene Toporkoff... Read all

How can news sites cross the language barrier and appeal to foreign readers?

thenextweb.com | March 2, 2011

Americans and Brits who are hungry for foreign news can find a quick overview without having to engage in the heavy lifting that would be required in order to navigate through every non-English news site. The Economist can maintain its news scarcity... Read all

Media Pros Unleashed: Disruption Drives Innovation

mediapost.com | January 7, 2011

In January 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds into its flight. It was about 11:30 in the morning, and I was a reporter at a daily newspaper in New Jersey. The time of day was significant because it meant that if we hustled, we could get the story into the afternoon edition of the paper.The editor actually... Read all

Online Journalism News

journalism.co.uk | November 19, 2010

A former bureau chief for Time magazine and former CEO of Ask.com France have co-founded a site which aims to offer journalists and the public translated news from non-English media... Read all

WorldCrunch: making global news accessible

editorsweblog.org | November 18, 2010

All news can be global and local, declares the website of new start-up WorldCrunch, whose mission is to provide English translations of news articles from around the world. "What we're looking for is to provide a global view of the world," co-founder Jeff Israely told the Editors Weblog... Read all

New international news project: WorldCrunch

ejc.net | November 11, 2010

Former Time magazine bureau chief in Europe Jeff Israely has announced his new international news project, WorldCrunch, on Nieman Lab. WorldCrunch, inspired by France's Courrier International among others, will collect and translated news content from around the world... Read all

Jeff Israely: An idea and a brand come together as Worldcrunch

niemanlab.org | November 10, 2010

This is a long overdue introduction: a kind of public christening, a chance to share with you, the reader, our vision for the future of news. Okay, you see... Read all

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Green

In Argentina, A Visit To World's Highest Solar Energy Park

With loans and solar panels from China, the massive solar park has been opened a year and is already powering the surrounding areas. Now the Chinese supplier is pushing for an expansion.

960,000 solar panels have been installed at the Cauchari park

Silvia Naishtat

CAUCHARI — Driving across the border with Chile into the northwest Argentine department of Susques, you may spot what looks like a black mass in the distance. Arriving at a 4,000-meter altitude in the municipality of Cauchari, what comes into view instead is an assembly of 960,000 solar panels. It is the world's highest photovoltaic (PV) park, which is also the second biggest solar energy facility in Latin America, after Mexico's Aguascalientes plant.

Spread over 800 hectares in an arid landscape, the Cauchari park has been operating for a year, and has so far turned sunshine into 315 megawatts of electricity, enough to power the local provincial capital of Jujuy through the national grid.


It has also generated some $50 million for the province, which Governor Gerardo Morales has allocated to building 239 schools.

Abundant sunshine, low temperatures

The physicist Martín Albornoz says Cauchari, which means "link to the sun," is exposed to the best solar radiation anywhere. The area has 260 days of sunshine, with no smog and relatively low temperatures, which helps keep the panels in optimal conditions.

Its construction began with a loan of more than $331 million from China's Eximbank, which allowed the purchase of panels made in Shanghai. They arrived in Buenos Aires in 2,500 containers and were later trucked a considerable distance to the site in Cauchari . This was a titanic project that required 1,200 builders and 10-ton cranes, but will save some 780,000 tons of CO2 emissions a year.

It is now run by 60 technicians. Its panels, with a 25-year guarantee, follow the sun's path and are cleaned twice a year. The plant is expected to have a service life of 40 years. Its choice of location was based on power lines traced in the 1990s to export power to Chile, now fed by the park.

Chinese engineers working in an office at the Cauchari park

Xinhua/ZUMA

Chinese want to expand

The plant belongs to the public-sector firm Jemse (Jujuy Energía y Minería), created in 2011 by the province's then governor Eduardo Fellner. Jemse's president, Felipe Albornoz, says that once Chinese credits are repaid in 20 years, Cauchari will earn the province $600 million.

The Argentine Energy ministry must now decide on the park's proposed expansion. The Chinese would pay in $200 million, which will help install 400,000 additional panels and generate enough power for the entire province of Jujuy.

The park's CEO, Guillermo Hoerth, observes that state policies are key to turning Jujuy into a green province. "We must change the production model. The world is rapidly cutting fossil fuel emissions. This is a great opportunity," Hoerth says.

The province's energy chief, Mario Pizarro, says in turn that Susques and three other provincial districts are already self-sufficient with clean energy, and three other districts would soon follow.

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