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A Case For Animal Welfare In Egypt

A Case For Animal Welfare In Egypt

Walking down a Cairo street with an adopted stray dog can elicit a range of reactions, from surprise to rebuke. Their skittish behavior and curled-up tails make them easily distinguishable from the more preferred purebred pets, says Mada Masr.

If these animals, commonly known as baladi dogs, are not rescued, they are at risk of forced euthanasia through government or private initiatives, which are often encouraged by complaints from the public.

Many countries have yet to utilize street animals in a productive way, and in Egypt, the treatment of animals — particularly dogs — requires a paradigm shift. In addition to a cultural and social stigma against them, these animals are often considered to be no more than pests, and are typically treated as such.

"Animal welfare is not part of our culture in Egypt," says Aya Shehata, a volunteer with TNR Maadi (trap, neuter and release). "People think of animals as some kind of object instead of something that has a soul, like us."

But for the first time in Egypt’s history, an article on animal welfare was approved in the January 2014 constitutional referendum. And while the legislation will not come into effect until a new parliament is sworn in, Article 45 does stipulate the "humane treatment of animals."

Read more from Mada Masr here.

A dog caught by TNR Maadi in June – Photo: TNR Maadi via Facebook

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Geopolitics

D.C. Or Beijing? Two High-Stakes Trips — And Taiwan's Divided Future On The Line

Two presidents of Taiwan, the current serving president, Tsai Ing-wen, and her predecessor, Ma Ying-jeou from the opposition Kuomintang party, are traveling in opposite directions these days. Taiwan must choose whom to follow.

Photo of Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen

Tsai Ing-wen, the President of Taiwan

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Tsai Ing-wen, the President of Taiwan, is traveling to the United States today. Not on an official trip because Taiwan is not a state recognized by Washington, but in transit, en route to Central America, a strategy that allows her to pass through New York and California.

Ma Ying-jeou, a former president of Taiwan, arrived yesterday in Shanghai: he is making a 12-day visit at the invitation of the Chinese authorities at a time of high tension between China and the United States, particularly over the fate of Taiwan.

It would be difficult to make these two trips more contrasting, as both have the merit of summarizing at a glance the decisive political battle that is coming. Presidential and legislative elections will be held in January 2024 in Taiwan, which could well determine Beijing's attitude towards the island that China claims by all means, including force.

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