WHILE YOU SLEPT

A Bolt Of Olympic History

SPOTLIGHT: A BOLT OF OLYMPIC HISTORY THAT WILL LAST

Last week, it was Michael Phelps reminding us that the Olympics are more than a passing photo op or filler for your Facebook feed. The American swimmer’s 12th individual medal matched a record of another famous Olympic athlete â€" from more than 2,100 years ago! Leonidas of Rhodes, a runner, had won 12 solo medals at four Games between 164 and 152 BC, considered one of the world’s oldest records.


Last night it was Usain Bolt’s chance to reach for Olympic “immortality,” taking home his third straight 100-meter dash title. In a year littered with doping scandals, some athletes can still achieve legendary status through sheer talent alone. The 9.81 seconds it took him to complete 100 meters in yesterday’s final, was actually the slowest of the three winning Olympic results for the now 29-year-old Jamaican star. But perhaps it was victory that carried the most meaning. “It wasn’t the perfect race, but the fact is I won,” he told reporters after the race.


Bolt was bullish about his chances to add to his legend, ahead of the 200m and 4x100m relay events later this week, aiming for a “triple triple” of three gold medals in three sprints in three consecutive Games. The crowning of the “fastest man on earth” is perhaps the singular defining moment for each Olympics. Doing it three Games running is a feat (and feet!) for the ages.


WHAT TO LOOK FOR TODAY

BOKO HARAM RELEASES CHIBOK GIRLS VIDEO

Islamist group Boko Haram released a video showing some of the 276 girls abducted from their northeastern Nigerian town of Chibok in 2014, Vanguard reports toayy. One terrorist says in the video that about 40 girls “have been married by the decision of Allah,” while others “have died as a result of aerial bombardment.” The Nigerian army is now looking for a journalist and two men who were reportedly sent the footage before public release. Read more from Al Jazeera.


SUSPECT ARRESTED IN NEW YORK IMAM SHOOTING

New York police have arrested a man suspected of killing an imam and his friend outside a mosque in Queens. The shooting, which occurred on Saturday afternoon, may have been motivated by an ongoing feud between Muslims and Hispanics in the neighborhood, the New York Daily News reports.


ANOTHER NIGHT OF VIOLENCE IN MILWAUKEE

A second night of protests in the city of Milwaukee escalated into violence with reports of gunfire, while protesters torched businesses and threw rocks at police officers. The protests were triggered by the fatal shooting of 23-year-old Sylville Smith, an African-American shot dead in a police chase after he refused to drop his gun. Read more from USA Today.


VERBATIM

“Modern medical techniques have allowed me to scrutinize the universe,” former Cuban leader Fidel Castro wrote in a public letter published for his 90th birthday on Saturday. Castro, who expressed his “deepest gratitude” for the well-wishers, also seized the opportunity to criticize U.S. President Barack Obama for not apologizing to the Japanese during his visit to Hiroshima. “He lacked the words to ask for forgiveness for the killings of hundreds of thousands of people,” he wrote.


MORE CIVILIANS KILLED IN ALEPPO

Heavy fighting in and around the Syrian city of Aleppo continued over the weekend with reports of several civilians caught in the crossfire between Syrian and Russian troops on the one hand and rebel fighters on the other, The New York Times reports. In Iraq meanwhile, Kurdish fighters have launched a new offensive to try and remove ISIS from the city of Mosul, the terrorist group’s Iraqi “capital.”


â€" ON THIS DAY

The hippie movement peaked 47 years ago, at the opening of the Woodstock Music & Art Fair. This and more in your 57-second shot of history.


U.S. SWIMMERS ROBBED AT GUNPOINT IN RIO

Ryan Lochte and three other U.S. swimmers were held at gunpoint and robbed early on Sunday in Rio by a group of thugs posing as armed police officers. “What is more important is that we are safe and unharmed,” Lochte said later in a statement. This unfortunately isn’t the first crime report to emerge out of the Olympics, and many athletes teams are taking extra precautionary measures, according to The Wall Street Journal.


2019

Britain’s exit from the EU could be delayed until 2019, as the new British government won’t be ready to initiate the process early next year as initially anticipated, The Sunday Times reported. Crucial elections in France and Germany next year were also named as a cause for the delay.


FIVE DEAD IN LOUISIANA FLOODS

At least five people have died in what has been described as historic flooding in Louisiana. President Barack Obama issued a disaster declaration for the state.


â€" MY GRAND-PERE’S WORLD

Of Metal And Meal â€" Tangermünde, 1975


HONG KONG PROTEST LEADERS AVOID JAIL

Joshua Wong and Nathan Law, two of the most prominent leaders of Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement, were spared jail but were sentenced to community service. A third leader, Alex Chow, was handed a three week prison sentence, suspended for a year. Read more from the South China Morning Post.


â€" WORLDCRUNCH-TO-GO

Reflecting on the evolution of feminine fashion over the past decade, from “the porn-star look sported in the good old days" by performers like Christina Aguilera and Britney Spears” to Lady Gaga’s infamous meat dress, Süddeutsche Zeitung’s David Pfeifer explains how fashion, for popstars and politicians alike, is a way of communicating without words. “Women can't simply be dressed; they have to be dressed the way they want to be perceived. And that is why women are usually right when they stand in front of their wardrobes and say, "I don’t have anything to wear." The woman who utters this sentence is not referring to the number of garments in her possession. She's talking about her inability to express herself for that particular occasion, or in her particular state of mind. Read the full article: That Straight Red Line From Lady Gaga To Angela Merkel.



MORE STORIES, EXCLUSIVELY IN ENGLISH BY WORLDCRUNCH


AN UNUSUAL ARCHER

Meet Matt Stutzman, one of the world’s best archers, who has no arms.


â€" Crunched by Marc Alves & Giacomo Tognini

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Green

In Argentina, A Visit To World's Highest Solar Energy Park

With loans and solar panels from China, the massive solar park has been opened a year and is already powering the surrounding areas. Now the Chinese supplier is pushing for an expansion.

960,000 solar panels have been installed at the Cauchari park

Silvia Naishtat

CAUCHARI — Driving across the border with Chile into the northwest Argentine department of Susques, you may spot what looks like a black mass in the distance. Arriving at a 4,000-meter altitude in the municipality of Cauchari, what comes into view instead is an assembly of 960,000 solar panels. It is the world's highest photovoltaic (PV) park, which is also the second biggest solar energy facility in Latin America, after Mexico's Aguascalientes plant.

Spread over 800 hectares in an arid landscape, the Cauchari park has been operating for a year, and has so far turned sunshine into 315 megawatts of electricity, enough to power the local provincial capital of Jujuy through the national grid.


It has also generated some $50 million for the province, which Governor Gerardo Morales has allocated to building 239 schools.

Abundant sunshine, low temperatures

The physicist Martín Albornoz says Cauchari, which means "link to the sun," is exposed to the best solar radiation anywhere. The area has 260 days of sunshine, with no smog and relatively low temperatures, which helps keep the panels in optimal conditions.

Its construction began with a loan of more than $331 million from China's Eximbank, which allowed the purchase of panels made in Shanghai. They arrived in Buenos Aires in 2,500 containers and were later trucked a considerable distance to the site in Cauchari . This was a titanic project that required 1,200 builders and 10-ton cranes, but will save some 780,000 tons of CO2 emissions a year.

It is now run by 60 technicians. Its panels, with a 25-year guarantee, follow the sun's path and are cleaned twice a year. The plant is expected to have a service life of 40 years. Its choice of location was based on power lines traced in the 1990s to export power to Chile, now fed by the park.

Chinese engineers working in an office at the Cauchari park

Xinhua/ZUMA

Chinese want to expand

The plant belongs to the public-sector firm Jemse (Jujuy Energía y Minería), created in 2011 by the province's then governor Eduardo Fellner. Jemse's president, Felipe Albornoz, says that once Chinese credits are repaid in 20 years, Cauchari will earn the province $600 million.

The Argentine Energy ministry must now decide on the park's proposed expansion. The Chinese would pay in $200 million, which will help install 400,000 additional panels and generate enough power for the entire province of Jujuy.

The park's CEO, Guillermo Hoerth, observes that state policies are key to turning Jujuy into a green province. "We must change the production model. The world is rapidly cutting fossil fuel emissions. This is a great opportunity," Hoerth says.

The province's energy chief, Mario Pizarro, says in turn that Susques and three other provincial districts are already self-sufficient with clean energy, and three other districts would soon follow.

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